Jeremiah, His Rescuer and Jesus

20th Sunday, Jer 38:4-6, 8-10 The vivid image of Jeremiah plopping ignominiously into the cistern of Prince Malchiah generates a pair of insights for me. First, the courage of the person who rescued him. The man’s name is not given and perhaps he was called "Ebed-Melek," which is "Servant (or slave) of the King," much the way women in service were called "Cook," if that is what they did and who they were in the view of those who employed them. In the tension and danger of a court bitterly divided over the efforts of the king to avoid capitulating to Babylon and those of Jeremiah to face the inevitability of defeat, this servant saved the life of a man out of favor with his boss: So a righteous Gentile. Second, I am reminded of Andrea del Sarto’s Cristo in pietà (ca. 1514-20, in Florence’s Galleria dell’Accademia, where Michelangelo’s David looms strong, beautiful and masterful): Between being mocked and crucified, Jesus sits, resting for a moment, stripped but for a red wrap, abject, alone, infinitely sad and yet somehow serene. Three studies in nonviolence: Jeremiah, his rescuer, Jesus. Barbara Green, OP
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

25,000 children and pilgrim sang the pope “Happy Birthday" today in St. Peter’s Square.
Gerard O’ConnellDecember 17, 2017
A reflection for the third Sunday of Advent
Elizabeth Kirkland CahillDecember 16, 2017
Homeless people are seen in Washington June 22. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chair of the U.S. bishops' domestic policy committee, released a statement Nov. 17 proclaiming that the House of Representatives "ignored impacts to the poor and families" in passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act the previous day. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
The United States is thwarting the advancement of millions of its citizens, a UN rapporteur says.
Kevin ClarkeDecember 16, 2017
Why not tax individuals for what they take out of society instead of what they contribute?
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.December 15, 2017