15th Sunday: Deut. and Ps.

The Deuteronomy reading and the Psalm (if the Ps. 19 option is selected) offers an opportunity to preach well about Torah, both biblical and as observed by Jews today. As Christians look from the outside, the particulars of "the law" can seem burdensome, pointless, or worse, as we may be tempted to think when trying to account for the priest and Levite in the parable. Various passages from St. Paul and the gospels make Torah dispreferred in discussion between Jesus’ followers and other Jews. But those passages were composed in particular circumstances, aimed at specific situations. Surely Paul sometimes experiences writer’s remorse as he sees to what use some of his language is put! If we know Jews who kvetch dramatically about cupboard-cleaning at Seder time, we probably also know how deep a part of their lives Passover ritual is. In these readings we are shown that law, or instruction, starts close to us. But we must bring it into our lives, explore and befriend it, offer it hospitality until it becomes family. And then we respond as Jesus suggests: A situation of need becomes motivated, grounded, though rarely easy. But easy was never part of the promise! Barbara Green, OP
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

The cardinal is the most senior churchman yet to be convicted of historical sexual offenses. His conviction is a grave blow not only to the church in Australia but also to Pope Francis.
Gerard O’ConnellDecember 12, 2018
Pope Francis has terminated the services of three cardinals who for the past five years were members of his council of nine cardinal advisors.
Gerard O’ConnellDecember 12, 2018
I like to think of Elizabeth’s unborn baby, the future prophet John the Baptist, dancing with delight in today’s Gospel of the Visitation.
Elizabeth Kirkland CahillDecember 12, 2018
The ruins of São Miguel das Missões, a 17th-century Jesuit mission in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, now preserved as a World Heritage Site by the United Nations. (iStock/Thiago Santos)
A new study finds higher literacy rates and income levels in the areas around former Jesuit missions in Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay.
Jim McDermottDecember 11, 2018