What do you think about "family cards"?

Here’s a little piece at NPR.org on the increasing popularity of the newest kind of Christmas card even among devout Christians: the family card.  (The other two are the religious card--Mary and Jesus.  And the secular card--snowmen and snowy villages.)

You all know what I’m talking about.  When opening your Christmas cards, you see the sender’s family instead of the Holy Family.  Or a picture from their vacation at Cabo San Lucas, instead of the story from the original San Lucas.  Or maybe a photo of the family dog with reindeer horns.  Don’t get me wrong: I love family photos at Christmas.  I just think they belong inside the card, not as the card itself.  In other words, less you and more Jesus.  Less Virgin Islands and more Virgin Mary.  See what you think here.

And what do you think?  I’m pretty curious.

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James Martin, SJ 

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8 years 10 months ago
How about what my wife and I did (along with our 2 mo. old daughter) last year? On the card was a picture of our family and the Holy Family. Note: We were not equating ourselves with the Holy Family. We just happened to be living 4000 miles from home at the time, just had our first baby, and wanted to wish our family and friends a Merry Christmas (we would not be home for it) and to send to them what would be the first picture of our daughter many of them would see.
8 years 10 months ago
I think that sending Christmas cards that have photos of the family as part of the card is an intrinsic evil and these families should be denied Communion. I am joking but it is an idea. I send Christmas cards that are religious icons. People who are not religious seem to especially appreciate these beautiful icons. Secular Carmelite Keith J. Egan tells us 'The recovery of beauty in Christian culture can have far-reaching effects for spirituality and, I would say, for the enhancement of Christian ethics where beauty would act as a revelation of the good and a powerful attraction for this good. John of the Cross's work is one of the many resources for laying a foundation of a theology of delight that would restore greater joy and celebration to the Christian life. The mystical tradition, with its fascination for the beauty of God, has much to offer an age looking for a way out of aimlessness.'
8 years 10 months ago
I do agree. Though, when I send out cards, I usually buy the religious cards for my friends and family who are believers and then, for the others, I will send them pretty much a generic Happy Holidays card. Sometimes, I just send out an email and create my own, mostly because I'm really bad about getting Christmas cards done and mailed in time for Christmas. BTW, Father, my birthday's in May, just so you can get my birthday card with your picture on it, ready. ;-)
8 years 10 months ago
Passed this onto my wife and this is her responses: What an old crumudgeon! Doesn't he realize that our families are holy families? That the point of Christmas is the INCARNATION - Jesus became one of us to live with us and in us. Thus as people of God with Jesus in our hearts, we are the holy family as a collective and as individual families.

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