Video Blogging III: Lectio Divina

Fr. Jim Martin presents his third video blog on prayer, this time on the practice of lectio divina. Previous video blogs covered the examination of conscience and Ignatian contemplation.

Tim Reidy

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9 years 5 months ago
In Scripture we read the story of the paralytic at the pool of Behsaida. All we really know about this paralytic is that he lay there helpless. It was Jesus who took the initiative and came across to him to give him back his health. The paralytic's entreaty was wordless and his need too great to be expressed. The paralytic simply offered himself in all his poverty. In prayer we bring God our patience, our helplessness, and our courage to stay there, looking at Jesus, empty-handed. Michael "Fear of one's weakness is a basic reaction of any human being. From the day we first realize, in one respect or another, that we cannot rely on our own strength, a tendency to worry takes root which can grow into great anxiety. All that we have said up to now leads to the loss of personal security by bringing to light what we have termed our vulnerability, our hidden disorders and the limits of our created condition. Each time, then, we have said to ourselves there is only one solution - to recognize the reality of what we are and place it in the hands of the Lord..." ~ A Carthusian, "The Wound of Love", page 85
9 years 5 months ago
I am a beginner with lectio divina. Currently my main goal with lectio is to maintain a stability, a gentle stability, with it. I take time for it every day. I believe lectio facilitates our responsiveness to the Lord. It is part of an ongoing and dynamic conversion. At times there will be unconscious opposition to it. This does not mean we are failing the Lord. It means we are changing. I try, often unsuccessfully, to not judge if my reading of Scripture is fruitful while I am actually doing lectio. Judgement at this time can easily become an unnecessary obstacle to lectio. Sometimes when I am restless and have to struggle to just pay attention, I get some of my best insights from lectio. Lectio is not mainly about information. It is mainly about prayer and our conversion. It is about savoring the Word. I am not an expert. If anything I have written is not helpful, ignore it.

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