Thanks to the Readers, Especially the Commentariat

Today is Thanksgiving Day and, like everyone, I have many reasons to be grateful and recognize in gratitude the start of any authentic religious experience. I hope you all, like me, will spend the day with loved ones enjoying the delights of table and conversation. Suavitas disci not potest nisi delectet, wrote Augustine, and today is a time for delectet.

I should especially like to thank our readers and those who post comments on the blog. As I have noted before, I do not reply to comments in the belief that I had my say in the original blog posting and the commentary section is for the readers. But, I always read your comments and I especially enjoy it when different readers strike up a debate with each other. So, thank you for reading and for adding your two cents. Lively debate and discussion are essential to the health of both Church and nation and I am continually impressed by the high-level of discussion our readers engage. Keep at it, but today, just enjoy the turkey and the fixings.  

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