Symposium to mark the 50th Anniversary of the Decree on Social Communications of the Second Vatican Council

In the Service of the Word: The Catholic Media & The New Evangelization
A symposium to mark the 50th Anniversary of the Decree on Social Communications of the Second Vatican Council
 
Co-sponsored by America and Saint Joseph’s Seminary and College
 
When: December 13, 2013
 
Where: Saint Joseph’s Seminary and College
201 Seminary Avenue
Yonkers, NY 10704
 
Open to the Public. Registration required.
 
R.S.V.P.
or call 212-515-0153
 

Background

The Catholic media has a vital role to play in re-proposing the Gospel in the contemporary United States. What are the challenges and opportunities for Catholic journalists in the United States today? How do Catholic journalists and media outlets meet the two-fold task of proclaiming the Gospel while also providing fair and balanced news and analysis? How do Catholic journalists and media outlets understand their individual relationships with the Church, both with the hierarchy and the larger People of God? How can the Catholic media serve the Church from within the Catholic tradition while also providing insight and reporting that is objective and encourages transparency and accountability? As Archbishop Claudio Celli, president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications has put it, “the church needs a media that is not afraid to expose mistakes and failures but whose motive is to challenge the community of believers to continue on the path of conversion, so that the church will be more fully what it is called by Christ to be.”

Program for the Day:

9:15 A.M.: Registration and Coffee Social
 
10:00: Mass – Feast of St. John of the Cross
Most Rev. John O’Hara, auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of New York
 
11:15: Opening Session – The Mission of the Catholic Journalist Today
Welcome: Rev. Msgr. Peter Vaccari, Rector, St. Joseph’s Seminary and College
Opening Remarks: Matt Malone, S.J., Editor in Chief, America
Perspective on Mission:
Jeanette Demelo – Editor in Chief, National Catholic Register
Meinrad Scherer-Emunds – Executive Editor, U.S. Catholic
Paul Baumann – Editor, Commonweal
R.R. Reno – Editor, First Things
 
1:00 P.M.: Lunch – Courtesy of Saint Joseph’s Seminary and College
 
2:00: Panel Discussion – Reflections on Morning Presentations
Panelists:
Jeanette Demelo – Editor in Chief, National Catholic Register
Meinrad Scherer-Emunds – Executive Editor, U.S. Catholic
Paul Baumann – Editor, Commonweal
R.R. Reno – Editor, First Things
Matt Malone, S.J. – Editor in Chief, America
Moderator: James Martin, S.J., Editor and Large, America
 
3:00: Coffee Break
 
3:15: Plenary Session with Audience Participants
 
4:30: Closing Reception – Courtesy of Saint Joseph’s Seminary and College
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

It is astonishing to think that God would choose to enter the world this way: as a fragile newborn who could not even hold up his own head without help.
Ginny Kubitz MoyerOctober 20, 2017
Protestors rally to support Temporary Protected Status near the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sept. 26. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
Around 200,000 Salvadorans and 57,000 Hondurans have been residing in the United States for more than 15 years under Temporary Protected Status. But that status is set to expire in early 2018.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 20, 2017
At the heart of Anne Frank’s life and witness is a hopeful faith in humanity.
Leo J. O'Donovan, S.J.October 20, 2017
Forensic police work on the main road in Bidnija, Malta, which leads to Daphne Caruana Galizias house, looking for evidence on the blast that killed the journalist as she was leaving her home, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. Caruana Galizia, a harsh critic of Maltese Premier Joseph Muscat, and who reported extensively on corruption on Malta, was killed by a car bomb on Monday. (AP Photo/Rene Rossignaud)
Rarely does the death of a private citizen elicit a formal letter of condolence from the Pope.