Robert Novak

The day did not officially begin in the office of Congressman Marty Meehan, whom I serfed for in the early 90s, without a discussion of that day’s political report from Rowland and Novak. Two of the last of the great postwar generation of determined, shoe-leather reporters, Rowland and Novak had a talent for finding a nugget of gold among the mountain of pyrite produced daily in Washington. Novak, (“Bob" to his friends; “Prince of Darkness” to his enemies and best friends), died today at the age of 78. Though a conservative, he was a close friend of Lyndon Johnson, which helped land him on the Nixon enemies’ list. Born a Jew, he converted to Catholicism in 1998 after a career criticizing the Israeli government. Usually scowling, always delightfully unpredictable, Novak lived his life like he followed a lead: with dogged determination--to wherever it led. R.I.P.

Matt Malone, S.J.

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

A reflection for the third Monday of Advent
Elizabeth Kirkland CahillDecember 17, 2017
25,000 children and pilgrim sang the pope “Happy Birthday" today in St. Peter’s Square.
Gerard O’ConnellDecember 17, 2017
A reflection for the third Sunday of Advent
Elizabeth Kirkland CahillDecember 16, 2017
Homeless people are seen in Washington June 22. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chair of the U.S. bishops' domestic policy committee, released a statement Nov. 17 proclaiming that the House of Representatives "ignored impacts to the poor and families" in passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act the previous day. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
The United States is thwarting the advancement of millions of its citizens, a UN rapporteur says.
Kevin ClarkeDecember 16, 2017