Robert Novak

The day did not officially begin in the office of Congressman Marty Meehan, whom I serfed for in the early 90s, without a discussion of that day’s political report from Rowland and Novak. Two of the last of the great postwar generation of determined, shoe-leather reporters, Rowland and Novak had a talent for finding a nugget of gold among the mountain of pyrite produced daily in Washington. Novak, (“Bob" to his friends; “Prince of Darkness” to his enemies and best friends), died today at the age of 78. Though a conservative, he was a close friend of Lyndon Johnson, which helped land him on the Nixon enemies’ list. Born a Jew, he converted to Catholicism in 1998 after a career criticizing the Israeli government. Usually scowling, always delightfully unpredictable, Novak lived his life like he followed a lead: with dogged determination--to wherever it led. R.I.P.

Matt Malone, S.J.

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Bishop Lawrence T. Persico of Erie, Pa., speaks during a meeting in late January at the headquarters of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
“I think we need complete transparency if we’re going to get the trust of the people back,” said Erie Bishop Lawrence T. Persico.
Mélanie Thierry as Marguerite Duras in “Memoir of War.” © Music Box Films
The film tells the story of a woman who worked for the German-controlled Vichy government but secretly joined the Resistance movement.
A. W. Richard Sipe (photo: Facebook)
Sipe's research into celibacy and priestly sexual behavior helped guide the work of church leaders and others responding to the clergy sexual abuse crisis.
Catholic News ServiceAugust 17, 2018
Did Pope Francis depart from Scripture and tradition in declaring the death penalty "inadmissible"? Or was his declaration rooted deeply in both?
Tobias WinrightAugust 17, 2018