Pontifical Mission's Issam Bishara discusses Christians in Lebanon

I recently wrote about my encounter with an Iraqi Christian refugee family in Lebanon during a press trip with the Catholic Near East Welfare Association in Nov. 2010. During that trip I also spoke briefly with Issam Bishara, the Vice President for the Pontifical Mission for the Middle East, about the work of the organization, the corruption in Lebanon, and the lives of Christians in the region. A quick podcast of our interview is available, below. I'll continue to post stories and photos from the trip in the coming weeks.

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Maria Leonard
7 years 7 months ago
Kerry - Thank you for posting this interview.  We need to keep learning the truth about the situation in the Middle East...and what we can do to bring about peace there.  I found enlightening Mr. Bishara's comment that Christians in the Middle East tend to be identified with the United States and therefore ''on the side of Israel,'' rather than natives of the land for 2,000 years. 

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