Photos from Syrian Refugee Camp

These photos comes courtesy of Dan Groody, C.S.C., of the University of Notre Dame, who recently traveled to Turkey to meet with Syrian refugees. You can read his report here.

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Beth Cioffoletti
5 years 12 months ago
Amazing photos, capturing the beauty, intelligence and resilience of peoples caught in an unimaginably tragic situation.  Dan Groody's report and photos make it all so personal and relatable and real, asking us to respond as human beings, one person to another. (and isn't that what God asks of us as well?)

We Americans are so insulated in our comfortable lives (who has ever lived in a tent like those in these photos?) that we are probably incapable of truly understanding the plight of most of the peoples of the world.  We never get beyond our political analyses (which, of course, explains it all) and stay perpetually spiritually stunted, all the while thinking that we have the right answers.

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