You’re Invited: a panel discussion on international religious freedom

Assyrian Christians, who had fled Syria and Iraq, carry placards and wave Assyrian flags during a gathering in late May in front of U.N. headquarters in Beirut. (CNS photo/Nabil Mounzer, EPA)

Following America’s special issue on international religious freedom, a group of experts will discuss the current hopes and challenges facing the world today in the exercise of religious freedom. Presenters include Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations; Dr. Maryann Cusimano Love, Associate Professor of International Relations, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.; and Drew Christiansen, S.J., Distinguished Professor of of Ethics and Development at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. The discussion will be moderated by Matt Malone, S.J., president and editor in chief of America Media, and is made possible through a partnership with the Catholic Communications Campaign.

WHERE: Sheen Center for Thought and Culture, 18 Bleecker St., New York, NY, 10012.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 30, 2016, at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

RSVP: Tickets are free and this event are open to the public. Please register by calling 212-515-0153 or by emailing events@americamedia.org  

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