Obama's Transition Team Interviews Jesus of Nazareth

Here are the notes from President-elect Barack Obama’s transition team’s interview of a bold "non-partisan" choice, who came highly recommended, for a cabinet position:

Jesus of Nazareth.

Advertisement

An excerpt....
 
 8.) Briefly describe the most controversial matters you have been involved in during the course of your career.
Lots here, unfortunately. Healed sick on Sabbath. (Big plus when we tackle healthcare reform.) Plucked ears of grain on Sabbath. (Will farming lobby be offended?) Spoke to Samaritan woman. (Samaritan-American vote is close to nil, except in blue states we own.) Chased businessmen from the Temple in Jerusalem. (Might be huge help in current anti-business climate.) Also, they were selling turtledoves. (Hello, PETA votes!) Unfortunately, charged with (I think) sedition by Roman government. Ask Berlusconi for details?

61.) Do you have any association with any person, group or business venture that could be used...to impugn your character.
Prostitutes, sinners, tax collectors. Also: formerly "possessed" people. Freaky actually, though to hear him describe it, they were pretty nice people, post-exorcism.

More here on Beliefnet.com

James Martin, SJ

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
9 years 7 months ago
The most controversial matters that would disqualify Jesus from a position in the Obama administration would be his love of children--born and unborn--and his belief that marriage is between a man and a woman.
9 years 7 months ago
This is true, Milbo, and Jesus made that clear to all of us when he stated, 'render onto Ceasar what is Ceasar's and to God, what belongs to God.'

Advertisement

The latest from america

So what does it matter what a celibate woman thinks about contraception?
Helena BurnsJuly 20, 2018
Former US President Barack Obama gestures to the crowd, during an event in Kogelo, Kisumu, Kenya, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo Brian Inganga)
In Johannesburg, Obama gave what some commentators consider his most important speech since he vacated the Oval Office.
Anthony EganJuly 20, 2018
With his "Mass," Leonard Bernstein uses liturgy to give voice to political unease.
Kevin McCabeJuly 20, 2018
Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, arrives for the Jan. 6 installation Mass of Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
Women often “bring up the voice of those who are the most vulnerable in our society,” says Hans Zollner, S.J., who heads the Centre for Child Protection in Rome.