In the News, September 26

Backstabbing? Pope Francis does not approve and John O'Malley, S.J., on a Vatican II pope.

Looking at stories of federal shutdowns past and Mr. Cruz goes to town on Washington with Robert David Sullivan.

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JP Morgan grand pubah James Dimon is in Washington today for a discussion with the Justice Department that could result in a $11 billion settlement to end criminal and civil investigtations related to "past abuses in residential mortgage-backed securities," you know, the epic Wall Street scams that propelled the 2008-10 economic crisis that crushed America's middle and working classes. Still no word on whether or not anyone at any bank or any brokerage house at any time will ever be held personally, criminally responsible for the devastating "adjustment" of 2008. (Does that read "bitter"?)

There is growing discord within the Syrian opposition to Bashar al-Assad.

"The U.S.-Iranian diplomatic train is rolling fast," says WaPo's David Ignatius, "with President Hassan Rouhani talking Wednesday about a three-month timetable for a nuclear deal.

Disturbing allegations about sex abuse emerge from the Dominican republic. Meanwhile Pennsylvania lawmakers are pushing to extend the statute of limitations for child sex abuse; a priest from Scranton was arrested on Spet. 20.

Jeffrey Sachs is still optimistic about ending poverty.

And a cautionary tale for our times: when tweets attack!

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The latest from america

 10.17.2018 Pope Francis greets Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
“We take people where they are, walking with them, moving forward,” Cardinal Blase Cupich said.
Michael J. O’LoughlinOctober 20, 2018
Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018