In the News, August 6th

Religious intolerance continues to be an issue in the Middle East: In Syria, Jesuits voice concern over missing priests and religious minorities are being victimized in Pakistan.  

Sixty-eight years after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Cardinal Turkson, speaks of achieving peace through inclusion and integration at the "Ten Days for Peace" initiative in Japan. Father Milani and Father Zabelka also offer reflections on this tragic event.

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At the Vatican, Pope Francis encourages promoting mutual respect through education between Muslims and Christians. The involvement of young Catholics continues to be impressive, even after the conclusion of World Youth Day, as Pope Francis remarks that young people are encountering the living Jesus and the Gospel is a message of hope and mercy

Eva Piper discusses how she found God after her husband's near death experience in her book "A Walk Through the Dark."

John A. Coleman, S.J. remembers Robert N. Bellah

Chicago sees pension crisis drawing near.  

 

 

 

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Carlos Leon
5 years 5 months ago
Catholics must go mainstream now. There is no turning back, the wheels are spinning rapidly in the forward direction. No more sideline watching . Pope francis wants us out in the world. Front page news is that Catholics are leading and making a difference like never before. I hope I live long enough to be part of it and to see it all happen. This post reminds me of Simon and Garfunkels "Silent night 7 o`clock news" but I would use "Take all the lost home" by Joe Wise.

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