MS most religious, New England least

Mississippi is the most religious state in the country, and New England is the least religious region, this according to Gallup's recently released findings. 

Most religiousLeast religious 

Gallup concludes:

America remains a generally religious nation, with more than two-thirds of the nation's residents classified as very or moderately religious. These overall national averages, however, conceal dramatic regional differences in religiosity across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Residents of Southern states are generally the most religious, underscoring the validity of the "Bible Belt" sobriquet often used to describe this region. Coupled with the Southern states in the high-religiosity category is Utah, the majority of whose residents are Mormon -- the most religious group in America today. On the other hand, residents of New England and a number of far Western states tend to be the least religious.

Religion is related to politics in today's America, and it is clear from a glance at Gallup's State of the States map that the most religious states in the union generally are the most Republican, while the least religious states skew more toward the Democratic Party. This means that the most divided states -- and thus, those where most of the heavy-duty campaigning in this year's presidential election will be taking place -- are the ones where residents tend to be neither at the very religious nor at the nonreligious end of the spectrum.

Read more here.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Jim McCrea
5 years 5 months ago
"Gallup classifies 40% of Americans nationwide as very religious - based on their statement that religion is an important part of their daily life and that they attend religious services every week or almost every week."

Ah, yes:  they say.  they say.

I say that I'm a millionaire.
Beth Cioffoletti
5 years 5 months ago
I wonder if "tribalism" is not closer to what passes for religion in some parts of the country, and that is why it is so closely tied to political allegiences.

I saw a clip of a preacher of some sort introducing Santorum in Louisiana.  The provocative tribal drumming up of the crowd to protect and preserve OUR race, OUR class, OUR Jesus was obvious.
David Pasinski
5 years 5 months ago
NY at 32%? Attending services at least once a week? 1 in 3 people? Not in Syracuse according to my own unscientific observations and gut feelings.  Self- reporting this is so suspect...

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

A woman holds up a sign during a rally against assisted suicide in 2016 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. (CNS photo/Art Babych)
The American College of Physicians called for better promotion of palliative and hospice care, which opponents of physician-assisted suicide say are underutilized areas of medicine that could address concerns of patients facing difficult illnesses.
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 21, 2017
(CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
"We have a priest who makes everyone feel welcome, says Mass with great reverence and gives meaningful homilies"
Our readersSeptember 21, 2017
Photo by Victor Lozano on Unsplash
Any willingness to cooperate across party lines is praiseworthy. Unfortunately, brinkmanship remains the preferred legislative strategy.
The EditorsSeptember 21, 2017
Pope Francis, seen here at St. Peter's Square in the Vatican on June 28, has announced two significant reforms in recent weeks by releasing statements motu proprio. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
When a pope issues a document “motu proprio,” it means he does so by his own motivation, and it can mean a significant change to church law.
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 21, 2017