MS most religious, New England least

Mississippi is the most religious state in the country, and New England is the least religious region, this according to Gallup's recently released findings. 

Most religiousLeast religious 

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Gallup concludes:

America remains a generally religious nation, with more than two-thirds of the nation's residents classified as very or moderately religious. These overall national averages, however, conceal dramatic regional differences in religiosity across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Residents of Southern states are generally the most religious, underscoring the validity of the "Bible Belt" sobriquet often used to describe this region. Coupled with the Southern states in the high-religiosity category is Utah, the majority of whose residents are Mormon -- the most religious group in America today. On the other hand, residents of New England and a number of far Western states tend to be the least religious.

Religion is related to politics in today's America, and it is clear from a glance at Gallup's State of the States map that the most religious states in the union generally are the most Republican, while the least religious states skew more toward the Democratic Party. This means that the most divided states -- and thus, those where most of the heavy-duty campaigning in this year's presidential election will be taking place -- are the ones where residents tend to be neither at the very religious nor at the nonreligious end of the spectrum.

Read more here.

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Jim McCrea
6 years 10 months ago
"Gallup classifies 40% of Americans nationwide as very religious - based on their statement that religion is an important part of their daily life and that they attend religious services every week or almost every week."

Ah, yes:  they say.  they say.

I say that I'm a millionaire.
Beth Cioffoletti
6 years 10 months ago
I wonder if "tribalism" is not closer to what passes for religion in some parts of the country, and that is why it is so closely tied to political allegiences.

I saw a clip of a preacher of some sort introducing Santorum in Louisiana.  The provocative tribal drumming up of the crowd to protect and preserve OUR race, OUR class, OUR Jesus was obvious.
David Pasinski
6 years 10 months ago
NY at 32%? Attending services at least once a week? 1 in 3 people? Not in Syracuse according to my own unscientific observations and gut feelings.  Self- reporting this is so suspect...

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