More Than A Monologue: Deb Word Reaches Out

On Sept. 16, Fordham University held a conference entitled "Learning to Listen: Voices of Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church." Deb Word, a panel speaker and member of Fortunate Families, shared her experience of raising her son, who is gay.

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Kerry Weber

Note: This post and video have been changed to reflect the correct title of the conference. "More Than A Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church" is the title of a conference series. "Learning to Listen" was the first in that series.

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Liam Richardson
6 years 1 month ago
A wonderful pro-life witness by this woman's exemplum.
David Harvie
6 years 1 month ago
Unfortunately, it appears that this video has been removed but Deb Word was such a memorable speaker at this first day of the More than a Monologue conference.  Talk about living gospel values by taking in a dozen homeless LGBT youth over the years!  Truly inspring.  I cannot wait for days 2, 3 and 4.  Thank you, Fordham, for initiating this much needed dialogue.
Porter Keller
6 years 1 month ago
I attended this conference and was especially moved by Deb's presentation.   When I attempted to talk to my adult gay son about how God loved him, he quoted Leviticus to me!  Clearly he, like Deb's son, didn't feel any welcome from Mother Church.  Everyone has a place at the Lord's table, regardless of race, home language or sexual orientation, and that message needs to be made clear. 

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