Michael Jackson: Our Future?

One of our newest Culture writers is Fr. Terrance W. Klein, an associate professor of theology at Fordham University and author of the book Vanity Faith: Searching for Spirituality Among the Stars.  He also wrote last week's review on "Mad Men," likening the hit AMC series to the morality tales of Flannery O'Connor.  In this new web-only piece for the Culture section, Klein looks at the strange and sad life of Michael Jackson and poses a provocative question: Is he our future?  That is, does his ability to change his looks at will, and in effect, create a new family separate from his own physical body, the way of the future?  Is Michael Jackson's life our Brave New World.  Here's Klein's intro:

He was one of the most commercially successful entertainers of all time. “Thriller” remains the world’s best-selling album. In four decades he earned 13 Grammy Awards and had 17 number-one songs. Fred Astaire, who ought to know, declared, “That boy moves in a very exceptional way. That’s the greatest dancer of the century.” And Frank Sinatra?  “The only male singer who I’ve seen besides myself and who’s better than me—that is Michael Jackson.”

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But there was another Michael Jackson: the boy who played with rats and the young man who slept in a hyperbaric chamber. Then came the plastic surgeries. The bizarre diet. The short marriage to Lisa Marie Presley. The ambiguous sexuality. Couldn’t one ascribe those oddities to the life of a celebrity? 

But what about the skin bleaching? Or sleeping with young boys and the charges of pedophilia? Or the family formed of children whose mothers he never married and probably didn’t sleep with? Or hiding his face behind surgical masks and swaddling his three children in veils? Should one conclude that Michael Jackson wasn’t so much extraordinary as bizarre?

Or is there a third possibility? Was Michael Jackson our once and future king? In other words, did his life chart the course of our own? It takes talent and drive to become a superstar, but also an ability to reflect back to the public something of its own spirit, its fears and hopes. Perhaps Jackon’s decisions are harbingers, like the symbolic actions of the ancient prophets, of what is to come.

Read the rest here.

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9 years 2 months ago
That photo of Michael Jackson is one of the worst available. You choose a bad one on purpose. MJ had vitiligo which is a disease. When it became advanced he choose to eliminate all the pigment in his skin so it would look uniform. His nose surgery went bad because of lupus so he had to have other surgeries to repair the damage. All the bizarre things you mentioned are not who he really was. Those were show business things done for publicity just like Janet Jacksons wardrobe malfunciton. He was a very normal person around regular people. A perfectly normal person. You are responsding to a caricature. MJ was not a pedophile. He was a sweet caring senstive soul who wanted to rid the world of racism, poverty, disease, and orphanges. The media dsetroyed MJ''s reputation and career. They convicted him of a crime in 2003 two years before his trial. He never had a chance to get the truth out. If you look up Was MJ Framed? you will see what reall happened. But people thought he was gay so a lynch mob went after him. They were like sharks wanting to tear him apart. They wanted his blood. He was innocent but was killed by an angry mob of hate because he was different. It makes me ashamed of the entire human race.
9 years 2 months ago
The fine portrait painter and tempestuous polemicist, Percy Wyndham Lewis, in the late teens/early twenties of the 20th. Centuiry, talked about human plastic as being the order of the day. One wants to appear the way one thinks others approve of, in order to get their approval, as opposed to achieving any inner fulfillment.
I am what my neighbor sees.
Spiritually VERY dangerous I would think.
Sinatra's comment is pathetically funny.

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