Lent and presidential politics

Over at Busted Halo, I explore how some Lenten practices might impact the presidential race. From the post: Santorum

For the past several months, I’ve followed with increasing dismay the degradation of the political process here, notably in the GOP presidential contest, though the systemic rot will surely continue well into the general election with both sides embracing miserable tactics that mislead, misinform, and tear down their opponents and in the process our level of political discourse.

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Already this year we’ve seen candidates distort their opponents’ records; question President Obama’s Christian faith and call philosophical opponents demonic; and exploit a sluggish economy with claims ofclass warfare. Obama is not immune; he fully embraced negative advertising in 2008 against chief rival Hillary Clinton and then in the general election, and his recent decision to forego a promise not to use Super PACs ensures that more is on tap for 2012.

Does it have to be this way, and can the Lenten season be an antidote to this political nastiness?

Read the full piece here.

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