Home Run for Sisters of Notre Dame

Here's a fun story involving a group of Catholic sisters in Baltimore, and what proved to be a very kind donation. From the Associated Press:

"Sister Virginia Muller had never heard of shortstop Honus Wagner. Wagner

But she quickly learned the baseball great is a revered figure among collectors, pictured on the most sought-after baseball card in history. And thanks to an unexpected donation, one of the century-old cards belongs to Muller and her order, the Baltimore-based School Sisters of Notre Dame.

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The Roman Catholic nuns are auctioning off the card, which despite its poor condition is expected to fetch between $150,000 and $200,000. The proceeds will go to their ministries in 35 countries around the world."

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