Gov. Schweizer: A New Image for the Dems?

Hillary Clinton’s solid, unambivalent endorsement of Barack Obama last night is the story of the day.  But Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer’s speech should also turn heads.  A broad-shouldered, ebullient former rancher with so much energy he couldn’t quite stand still as he spoke to the delegates, Schweitzer showed an old school, plain spoken, man’s man populism rarely exhibited these days in the Democratic party.

Sporting a bolo-tie and speaking with awkward earnestness, he offered a new, sorely needed post-East Coast-elite image of the party, one that at times energized and surprised the convention.  

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In March of 2007 Charlie Rose did this interview with Governor Schweitzer.  I highly recommend it; his comments show thoughtfulness and a great ability to get beyond party to the real issues that affect people. (For one example, check out his discussion of guns to be found at the 8 minute mark.)

 

Jim McDermott, S.J.

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