Fund Set Up to Honor Murdered Nun

I lived for one year in Fort Defiance, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation, about a half hour south of Navajo, NM, where Sister Marguerite Bartz was killed last November. During my time on the reservation, I often interacted with a Sister of the Blessed Sacrament, who like Bartz, strove for peace and justice. She worked incredibly hard to keep our small parish going, and I couldn't help but think of her when I read about a new fund set up to support women like her and Sister Marguerite. According to The Daily Times:

Women serving religious roles in isolated areas are expected to benefit from a fund set up in honor of Sister Marguerite Bartz, who was murdered in November in her home on the Navajo Nation.

The Catholic Church Extension Society has established a fund in Bartz's name to help support the work of like-minded women across the country. The fund will supplement $1.5 million to be distributed this year to sustain women ministering in 33 dioceses.

To donate to the Sister Marguerite Bartz Fund, contact the Development Office of Catholic Extension at catholicextension.org or 800-842-7804.

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Beth Cioffoletti
8 years ago
Did they ever find out who murdered her, and why?

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

A blockbuster exhibition profiles one of the 20th century's great bridge figures.
Rob Weinert-KendtApril 26, 2018
History records many great men and women who would have been set aside without the aid of someone able to see past their faults.
Terrance KleinApril 26, 2018
Patrick J. Conroy, S.J., seen here in June 2017, had been the chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives since 2011.  (CNS photo/Rhina Guidos)
Patrick Conroy, S.J., submitted his resignation earlier this month. The Hill reports that a prayer seen as critical of the Republican tax bill may have been a factor.
Speaking in Chicago to a gathering of U.S. priests, Archbishop Wilton Gregory addressed racism, sexism and a host of other societal challenges that "continue to hold us captive."