The Conversation Continues: Responses to Questions from the Fordham "Lost?" Conference

For those following the conversations on this blog and elsewhere about the recent "Lost?" conference at Fordham, on twenty-somethings and the Catholic Church, a new round of conversation is up at the "Lost?" website. Right here, you can read some questions and comments posed by those who attended, and responses from several of the speakers (including James Martin, Lisa Cataldo, Bill McGarvey, Colleen Carroll Campbell, David Campbell, Jennifer Sawyer, and myself), with more responses to come. For reasons well-explored on this and other blogs, no one, of course, will take these responses as the last words on the topic. Perhaps they will at least provide occasion or assistance for those who want to think through the span of relationships that young adults take up to the Catholic Church today. 

Tom Beaudoin

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Hastings-on-Hudson, New York

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6 years 8 months ago
Excellent is right.
I hope the transcripts are up soon so everybody can follow.
I thought Tom's final comment about a slow bu trealistic process was germane to genuinely going forward.
Issues about the browning of the Church and inculturation are extremely important, and, except in a few places, in my opinion, are not getting the attention they deseve.
Finally, at the parish level, better programs to attract these young people and to listen to them, no tindoictrinate them, would be helpful.
6 years 8 months ago
Excellent is right.
I hope the transcripts are up soon so everybody can follow.
I thought Tom's final comment about a slow bu trealistic process was germane to genuinely going forward.
Issues about the browning of the Church and inculturation are extremely important, and, except in a few places, in my opinion, are not getting the attention they deseve.
Finally, at the parish level, better programs to attract these young people and to listen to them, not indoictrinate them, would be helpful.
Frank Gibbons
6 years 8 months ago
My wife and I had a good laugh when we read about this conference.  Two of our children recently attended Fordham.  Before they got there, they attended Mass faithfully and had a healthy respect for their faith.  Now, they go to Mass when they feel like it.  One of them had very close ties with several Jesuits.  I don't think the problem lies just at the parish level.  The Jesuits share part of the blame for losing our youth. 

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