Church home for sale

Here's something fun for a Friday, from AOL News:

The century-old church has a pulpit, a pew and a bell tower. But instead of a congregation, the historic, red-brick structure has a single occupant, the homeowner.

Siamak Akhavan purchased the 20,000-square-foot building five years ago and transformed it into an unusual single-family residence. Now, he's ready to sell. He has put the former Golden Gate Lutheran Church on the market for $7.49 million.

"Some people say that it's weird and eerie, but my perspective is that this is a house of the Lord," Marcus Miller, a real estate agent representing Akhavan, told AOL News. "What better place to re-purpose and live than a house that has been blessed. One could say it's a step toward heaven."


See the listing here, and check out a photo below:

Inside 1










See more photos here.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
ed gleason
6 years 9 months ago
San Francisco Catholic Archdiocese sold St Brigids, a lot  bigger church  and in a much better San Francisco neighborhood for 3 million. It's all about presentation I guess.
Jim McCrea
6 years 9 months ago
There is obviously an untapped market in unused old behemoths of Catholic Churches.  Just think of them as an untapped resource for funds to pay child abuse claims.
Jim McCrea
6 years 9 months ago
I have been informed by a San Francisco realtor that this has been sold to a school for about $6 million.


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