The Catholic Book Club Returns!

OK, so the Catholic Book Club hasn’t gone anywhere. Every month since 1928, the CBC--as we fondly call it--has been picking the best in Catholic fiction and non-fiction for the benefit of America’s readers, first via a subscription mail service and now on the Web. But we recently unveiled a newly redesigned CBC page, and we’ll hope you’ll check it out. You can read about this month’s pick, scroll through past selections, and read Fr. Jim Martin’s article on How to Start a Book Club. We’re working on compiling a full list of CBC picks since 1928. As you might expect, all of the heavy hitters make an appearance--Merton, Day, O’Connor, Nouwen. For the first take on today’s Catholic classics, you can subscribe to our CBC newsletter. Just enter your email address in the box marked "email updates" in the bottom right hand corner, and choose "Catholic Book Club." And remember, all Web-only content--including the CBC, podcasts, video, and archive articles (listed under "In These Pages")--can be accessed via the navigation bar on the right. Tim Reidy, Online Editor
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