The Boston Globe and the Church

The mere mention of The Boston Globe causes terror and anxiety in some Catholic circles, so it was a pleasant surprise to read not one, but two uplifting stories in this past Sunday's edition. Both focused on the ministry of Boston's leader, Cardinal Sean O'Malley. The first, O'Malley speaks to a residentappearing above the fold on the front page, is entitled, "'You are not forgotten about;' Behind bars a cardinal's quiet prison ministry," and chronicles O'Malley's history of work with prisoners as a young priest and how he has continued the ministry in Boston. The second, in the Metro section, is called, "O'Malley holds prayer service at shelter," highlighting the Cardinal's Christmas prayer service at a Boston homeless shelter. 

Both are compelling pieces noting the compassion the Church offers to those who live on the margins on society. Read the prison story here and the shelter piece here.

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Beth Cioffoletti
7 years 7 months ago
This is so special, especially the video.  I remember Cardinal O'Malley from when he was bishop at the Palm Beach diocese.  Prisoners are the lepers of our society today, and not many are willing to enter into their world with hope and friendship.  Thank you Cardinal O'Malley and the Boston Globe for reporting this.

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