Blogging Bishop Christopher Coyne Named to Diocese of Burlington

New appointment in the diocese of Burlington, Vermont, where Auxiliary Bishop Christopher Coyne of Indianapolis has been named bishop.

Bishop Coyne, 56, is a prelate who believes in the digital world and became comfortable with social media when it was just becoming known. He evangelizes where young people can be found, on the Web.

As one of the first churchmen on the Web he started his own blog "Let us Walk Together: Thoughts of a Catholic Bishop." He is chair-elect of the U.S. Bishops' Committee on Communications, which means he also will become a member of the bishops' Communications Committee, when he assumes chairmanship of the Communications Committee next year.

As a priest of the Boston Archdiocese he worked for Boston's Catholic TV Network and was nominated for an Emmy Award.

Bishop Coyne was ordained for the Archdiocese of Boston and came to prominence as a spokesman for the Boston Archdiocese when it was under fire for Cardinal Bernard Law's handling of sexual abuse of minors by clergy. Bishop Coyne's competency in this role drew widespread attention. The native New Englander holds an undergraduate degree in business from University of Massachusetts-Lowell and graduate degrees in liturgical studies from Rome's pontifical university San Anselmo.

 

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Are the Dodgers now baseball’s cursed squad?
James T. KeaneOctober 23, 2018
 Capuchin Franciscan Father Raniero Cantalamessa, preacher of the papal household, gives the homily during the Good Friday service led by Pope Francis in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican April 14. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Capuchin Father Raniero Cantalamessa, preacher of the papal household, will direct the Ignatian style retreat, the U.S.C.C.B. announced Oct. 23.
Catholic News ServiceOctober 23, 2018
A Catholic literary culture that works in continuity with its rich heritage will give us a contemporary literature that both gazes unflinchingly at the messiness of our present moment and artfully works out its characters’ salvation or damnation.
Joshua HrenOctober 23, 2018
Venezuelan migrants walk across the border from Venezuela into the Brazilian city of Pacaraima. (CNS photo/Nacho Doce)
About 5,000 people leave Venezuela every day. According to the U.N. Refugee Agency, at least 1.9 million Venezuelan citizens have left the country since 2015, fleeing from the economic and political crisis that the country is experiencing under President Nicolás Maduro.
Filipe DominguesOctober 22, 2018