Amy-Jill Levine to discuss Jesus' parables in March 11 lecture at American Bible Society

In the fourth installment of "The Living Word" lecture series, New Testament scholar Amy-Jill Levine will present "Jesus’ Parables: Jewish Stories, Christian Interpretations, Universal Lessons."

The event will take place Wednesday, March 11, at 6:30 p.m. at the American Bible Society in New York.

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RSVP to MSarci@AmericanBible.org

Amy-Jill Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences. She is also Affiliated Professor, Woolf Institute: Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations at Cambridge, UK. Her most most recent book is Short Stories by Jesus: the Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi. A self-described "Yankee Jewish feminist who teaches in a predominantly Christian divinity school in the buckle of the Bible Belt," Professor Levine combines historical-critical rigor, literary-critical sensitivity, and a frequent dash of humor with a commitment to eliminating anti-Jewish, sexist, and homophobic theologies.

The Living Word: Scripture in the Life of the Church” is America's a two-year, multi-platform project in collaboration with the American Bible Society aimed at promoting deeper engagement with the Bible. 

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