Abp Dolan on the Jesuits, St. Ignatius and Ignatian Spirituality

With even greater resonance now for Catholics in the United States, here is a repeat of a podcast episode featuring Archbishop Timothy Dolan, the newly elected president of the USCCB.  During the interview, which first ran on his weekly Sirius XM show in September, the archbishop spoke movingly with me about his relationship with the Society of Jesus, his admiration for St. Ignatius Loyola, and, most touchingly, of a particular experience he had in using Ignatian contemplation during a retreat.  I'm somewhat biased since I'm a big fan of the archbishop--especially in his joyful proclamation of the Gospel--but I think it's well worth a listen, even for a second time. 

 

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8 years 4 months ago
Ann: Your problem is not with the Archbishop. Your problem is with the teaching of the Catholic Church.
ANN ODONOGHUE
8 years 4 months ago
You are correct Maria, that is why I left the church a long time ago. My only regret was that I didn't see or understand the hypocrisy and discrimination earlier.

8 years 4 months ago
Well, that was great!  Very interesting.
8 years 4 months ago
PS - I agree that Dolan's proclamation of is joyful (loving), but it also resounds with Truth. 

Caritias en Veritate; let's not emphasize one aspect over the other and become mere sentimentalists.
8 years 4 months ago
His joy, it would seem, is rooted in the Truth. His description of picking up the baby Jesus is SO like him. What are your thoughts on his new appointment, Father?
8 years 4 months ago
Father: So why not give him his due and provide the kind of commentary afforded anything else at America ? It is possible that some would interpret the silence as lack of support which clearly does not seem to be the case with regard to your own perspective, right?
Pearce Shea
8 years 4 months ago
Maria, I'd point out, in Fr. Martin's defense, that there have been what, three? four? blog posts on the election since it occurred.
Bill Mazzella
8 years 4 months ago
Dolan is a welcome change from Egan who was unnatural, haughty with a hubris unmatched. Many of us were pleased that an Archbishop of New York can show genuine jjoy. At the same time Dolan does not seem to rise above the approval of torture which too many right wingers favor. His lack of leadership on health care does not speak well for him.

Joviality is good. His willingness to engage is heartening. At the same time the gospel is more than just smiles and joviality.

It is also troubling how too many here automatically approve what bishops do. Our criteria should always be: "By their fruits you shall know them." Remember Jesus got on the religious leaders of his day since they lost their focus. We lack a conscience if we rubber stamp everything.
8 years 4 months ago
Dear Father: Please do not misunderstand me. I am well aware of your appreciation for Abp Dolan, to wit frequent commentary and your endorements of him. Certainly, there have been more than a few postings on Abp Dolan's appointment; however, there has not been a single posting solely devoted to his appointment lauding the selection w/ reasons why. That is what I was trying to say albeit without success.
Vince Killoran
8 years 4 months ago
It's interesting to read Maria's complaint (who, BTW, claims on another website's blog that AMERICA's reporting on Dolan has been "deafening") since I was about the write to urge the magazine to maintain greater journalistic distance about the archbishop. 
ANN ODONOGHUE
8 years 4 months ago
No one is a bigger fan?

How can you be a fan of a man who would deny people their human rights?  That is essentially what he wants to do when it comes to gay unions and it both shocks and saddens me to see you, of all people, endorse him so completely.

:(

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