Your Legacy with 'America'

For more than a century, the Jesuit ministry of America has provided a smart, Catholic take on faith and culture. Today, in a world plagued by ideological, political and even ecclesial divisions, America’s unique ministry of reconciliation is more important than ever.  We are committed to addressing the problems of the church and society by generating content that bridges the divides created by faction. All of our content embodies the spirit of Christian charity that has marked America commentary since 1909. And in the years ahead, regardless of the time or the latest digital medium, America will continue to fulfill its Jesuit mission of interpreting the church for the world and the world for the church with content that is excellent, unique, accessible and relevant. 

We ask that you prayerfully consider making a planned gift to provide support for our yearly operational expenses and specific funding initiatives for expanded coverage, Ignatian spirituality, ‘next generation’ outreach and to build an endowment to meet our future needs. 

Jesuit Legacy Society Description

 

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