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Voices
James T. Keane is a senior editor at America.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
While Éamon de Valera, the great politician and Irish patriot, is not always remembered fondly by all Irish, the writers and editors of America couldn’t get enough of him.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
America isn't always great about sports coverage—but college basketball has been an exception, particularly when it comes to March Madness.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
John Hope Franklin wrote of the African American struggle for justice for seven decades. At his death, he was called "the first great American historian to reckon the price owed in violence, autocracy and militarism.”
simple food and water in front of a book showing lenten fasting
FaithScripture Reflections
James T. Keane
A Reflection for Friday after Ash Wednesday, by James T. Keane
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
What book will you pick up this Lent? America editors have never been shy about making recommendations on this topic, and over the years, various contributors have also given suggestions on everything from Scripture to novels to devotional reading and more.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
Valentine’s Day has not historically been the favorite holiday of America writers, but reflections on love have always found a home in these pages.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
Richard Nixon called McLaughlin one of the only good Jesuits among “all-out, barn-burning radicals” in a conversation with Billy Graham.
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
A year after his death, a look back on the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh—and his influence on many American writers on nonviolence, mindfulness and contemplative spirituality.
FaithScripture Reflections
James T. Keane
A Reflection for the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, Apostle, by James T. Keane
Arts & CultureCatholic Book Club
James T. Keane
In his many articles for America over the years (his first appeared in 1968), Archbishop John Quinn tackled issues ranging from synodality to sex abuse to the priest shortage to abortion. Do those sound familiar today?