Vatican

Pope Francis seemed to signal a change already in early July when he named seven women and a religious brother as full members of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life.
Opening the Vatican tombs of a princess and a duchess July 11 in a search for the remains of a young Italian woman missing for more than 30 years, the Vatican found no human remains at all.
The complex process of examining bones and extracting DNA will be crucial in determining whether the remains in a small Vatican cemetery belong to Emanuela Orlandi, a young woman who disappeared in 1983, a Vatican-appointed forensic anthropologist said.
Sister Mary Clare Millea, then superior general of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, speaks on Dec. 16, 2014 at a Vatican press conference for release of the final report of a Vatican-ordered investigation of U.S. communities of women religious. Sister Millea was the Vatican-appointed director of the visitation. At right is Archbishop Jose Rodriguez Carballo, secretary of the Vatican's Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) 
“We have to admit that things move very slowly in the church,” Sharon Holland, I.H.M., told America, “But this is a piece of really good news.”
Pope Francis greets Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople outside the Basilica of St. Nicholas in Bari, Italy, July 7, 2018.
Patriarch Bartholomew said, "Pope Francis made this grand, fraternal and historic gesture" of giving the Orthodox fragments of the relics of St. Peter.
The Teutonic cemetery at the Vatican is seen in this 2015 file photo. The decision to open two tombs in the cemetery was made in response to the request of Emanuela Orlandi's family and their questioning "the possible concealment of her cadaver in the small cemetery located within Vatican City State." She disappeared in 1983. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
The decision was made in response to the request of Emanuela Orlandi's family, he said, and their questioning "the possible concealment of her cadaver in the small cemetery located within Vatican City State."