Terrorism

Mark LaBelle August 07, 2019
Upon hearing about some unthinkable violence somewhere in the world, the first thing I do when I get to the church on Sunday morning is pencil another intention into the prayers of the faithful. In some small way, it feels like a solemn duty.
Family members of victims react while praying during the reopening ceremony of St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo, Sri Lanka, June 12, 2019, months after it was closed because of an Easter bombing. (CNS photo/Dinuka Liyanawatte, Reuters) 
Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, the archbishop of Colombo, said that he has no faith in the investigations to date—one by a commission and one by a committee—into the April 23 attack.
A man prays on June 15, 2016, in front of photographs of victims of the mass shooting at an L.G.B.T. nightclub in Orlando, Fla., during a vigil at a nearby church. The mass shooting was one of the hate crimes discussed on July 16 at a hearing held by the Helsinki Commission. (CNS photo/Jim Young, Reuters) 
Father James Martin was among the religious leaders testifying to members of the Helsinki Commission, which monitors human rights worldwide, about a surge in reported hate crimes.
Catholic News Service May 24, 2019
"We express our strongest condemnation at this disquieting wave of violence and assure our bruised brethren of solidarity, prayerful communion and compassion."
Rabbi Arthur Schneier and Dr. Mohammad Abdulkarim Al-Issa (Diane Bondareff for Appeal of Conscience Foundation)
Kevin Clarke May 17, 2019
Following attacks on houses of worship in Sri Lanka, New Zealand and the United States, Muslim and Jewish leaders sign a joint call for cooperation among different faiths.
The Catholic Church in Sri Lanka is hopeful that schools will reopen soon for the first time since the Easter Sunday attacks on churches and hotels.