Synod on the Amazon

Celestina Fernandes da Silva, a Catholic activist, waters flowers in front of her home in the Wapishana indigenous village of Tabalascada, Brazil, on April 3, 2019. (CNS Photo/Paul Jeffrey) 
Eduardo Campos Lima October 15, 2019
According to priests and women religious who have worked in the Amazon for decades, the particularities of the Catholic mission in the region—especially the lack of clergy to attend to thousands of geographically isolated communities—has led them to make hard choices.
October 15, 2019
Anitalia Pijachi, an indigenous woman from the Amazonian town of Leticia, Colombia, came to the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon bringing a message from the elders of her people to Pope Francis, an elder of the Catholic Church.
Luke Hansen, S.J. October 13, 2019
Participants expressed support for proposals to ordain women deacons and warned of the deadly consequences of climate change.
Medical Mission Sister Birgit Weiler speaks at a news conference after a session of the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon at the Vatican Oct. 11, 2019. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) 
Sister Birgit Weiler told journalists on Oct. 11 that such changes would allow the church to become “a community of sisters and brothers, sharing faith, discerning together.”
Luke Hansen, S.J. October 10, 2019
On day four of the synod, the small language groups have begun to meet, signaling the moment in the synod process when “in a synodal way, everyone gives their contribution.”
"Our Christian faith and the church teach us to seek and to find God in all things, as St. Ignatius says in the Spiritual Exercises. There is no pantheism in this."