Supreme Court

Justice Sonia Sotomayor said more explanation was needed about ending DACA because she said it was "a choice to destroy lives."
Because of the future of the DACA program is so uncertain, an immigration counselor for Catholic Charities in Wisconsin has decided to move her family to Canada.
A podium is seen in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Oct. 2, 2019, prior to the start of a DACA demonstration. On Nov. 12, the court will hear arguments in a challenge to the Trump administration's termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The case will affect the lives of more than 700,000 young people who were brought to the U.S. as minors without documentation. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
J.D. Long-García November 11, 2019
“Our nation made a promise to these ‘Dreamers,’” Archbishop Gomez wrote. “We have a moral obligation. It is time for the president and Congress to honor that promise and live up to this obligation.”
Activists and supporters block the street outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Oct. 8, 2019, as it hears arguments in three major employment discrimination cases on whether federal civil rights law prohibiting workplace discrimination on the "basis of sex" covers gay and transgender employees. (CNS photo/Jonathan Ernst, Reuters)
Michael J. O’Loughlin October 11, 2019
How faith-based employers could be affected by a ruling in favor of L.G.B.T. employees remains to be seen. More than 20 states and Washington, D.C., have passed job protections for L.G.B.T. people.
"Justice is a divine characteristic of God himself. Whether we are Christian, Jewish or Muslim in heritage—we all believe that God is perfectly just and always merciful," Washington's archbishop said.
The nonprofit group Hope Border Institute, based in El Paso, Texas, said the court's decision reflects "a disturbing pattern that emerges when the Supreme Court starts using its power, however temporarily, to greenlight Trump's anti-immigrant agenda."