Supreme Court

A man walks past a memorial on Aug. 7, 2019, for those killed in a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, four days earlier. Three U.S. bishops' committee chairmen issued a statement Aug. 8 to call on the nation's elected officials "to exert leadership in seeking to heal the wounds" of the country caused by the Aug. 3 and 4 mass shootings and urged an end to hateful rhetoric many see as a factor in the violence particularly in Texas. The Aug. 3 shooting in El Paso, Texas, was followed less than 24 hours later by th
Ellen K. Boegel August 16, 2019
Unlike other nations that prohibit or narrowly restrict ownership of high-body-count weaponry and ammunition, the United States is hindered in establishing effective gun control by federal and state constitutional roadblocks. Understanding these roadblocks is essential to devising a route around
From his appointment by President Gerald Ford in 1975 through his retirement in June 2010, he shaped decisions that touched countless aspects of American life.
Visitors walk around the 40-foot Maryland Peace Cross dedicated to World War I soldiers on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 in Bladensburg, Md. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
The Supreme Court ruled that a 40-foot tall, cross-shaped World War I memorial can continue to stand on public land in Maryland.
Pro-life advocate Joe San Pietro participates in a 40 Days for Life vigil near the entrance to a Planned Parenthood center in Smithtown, N.Y., on March 26. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
Ellen K. Boegel June 13, 2019
The Supreme Court has overruled longstanding precedents before, writes Ellen K. Boegel, but usually to end the confusion or chaos from an ‘erroneous’ decision. Will a majority describe Roe v. Wade that way?
April 04, 2019
Texas previously allowed state-employed clergy to accompany inmates into the room where they'd be executed, but its prison staff included only Christian and Muslim clerics.
In two recent actions, the U.S. Supreme Court revealed its death penalty decisions are hardly cut and dried.