Humanitarian Aid

Tourists stand at Rome's Trevi Fountain Aug. 2, 2017. (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)
Catholic News Service January 14, 2019
"No one ever thought about depriving Caritas of these funds," Raggi told L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican newspaper, Jan. 14. "The diocesan agency plays an important role for many needy and for the city of Rome, which wants to continue to be the capital of welcome for the weakest."
A woman is rescued by aid workers of Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms in the Central Mediterranean Sea on Dec. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Olmo Calvo)
Kevin Clarke January 11, 2019
The U.N.’s International Organization for Migration reports that for the fifth consecutive year more than 4,500 people are believed to have died or gone missing on migration routes around the world in 2018.
“The reappearance of some populist and nationalist impulses today is progressively weakening the multilateral system,” Pope Francis said, “resulting in a general lack of trust, a crisis of credibility in international political life and a gradual marginalization of the most vulnerable members of the family of nations.” In December thousands marched in an outpouring of discontent with the autocratic rule of nationalist president Aleksandar Vucic. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)
Gerard O’Connell January 07, 2019
“The reappearance of some populist and nationalist impulses today is progressively weakening the multilateral system,” Pope Francis said, “resulting in a general lack of trust, a crisis of credibility in international political life and a gradual marginalization of the most vulnerable members of
A father gives water to his severely malnourished daughter at a feeding center in Hodeida, Yemen, in September 2018. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File)
Ten percent of the world’s people are still living in extreme poverty, and this year nearly 132 million people will need humanitarian assistance and protection, mostly because of the effects of armed conflict.
The badly damaged church of Mar Behnam and Mart Sarah awaits repairs in Baghdeda (Qaraqosh), Iraq. In the foreground is the church's collapsed bell tower, demolished by Daesh, as ISIS is known here, during its retreat from the city. Photo by Kevin Clarke.
Kevin Clarke December 21, 2018
The Christian community in Iraq has been decimated by decades of conflict, persecution and disorder, culminating in the unbelievable savagery of ISIS. After two millennia in Iraq, the Christian population has reduced to a vanishing point, raising concerns around the world about the viability of
Nadia Murad, a Yazidi who escaped the Islamic State and a co-recipient of this year's Nobel Peace Prize, reacts while speaking at a news conference at the International Federation for Human Rights office in Paris on Oct. 25. An international human rights group says foreign fighters, including many Europeans, were responsible for carrying out the Islamic State group's atrocities against minority Yazidis. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Around half of the estimated 6,800 Yazidis taken captive are still missing. Women and girls from the minority who escaped described an organized system of slavery overseen by high-ranking foreign fighters.