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Pope Francis, seated, smiles as he speaks into a microphone, flanked by a laughing man and woman
FaithNews
Cindy Wooden - Catholic News Service
Pope Francis urged attendees of the Economy of Francesco event to be concrete, to involve the poor, to care for the Earth and to create jobs.
A man in a blue suit bows to Pope Francis, with a sister in her habit standing to his left
FaithNews
Carol Glatz - Catholic News Service
“You can leave a mark,” Pope Francis told members of the global network; just make sure that “your mark is positive and moves toward integral human development.”
Jeremy Myers, left, of the Aids Healthcare Foundation delivers water to Shaun Brown in Jackson, Miss., Thursday, Sept. 1, 2022. A recent flood worsened Jackson's longstanding water system problems. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Kevin Clarke
America’s water systems have been neglected and underfunded for decades. Jackson, Miss., and other mostly Black communities are among the first to face the consequences.
FaithNews
Junno Arocho Esteves - Catholic News Service
“We are reaching a breaking point,” the pope wrote in his message for the World Day of Prayer for Creation.
A colorful array of fresh fruits and vegetables on a platter.
FaithFaith in Focus
Chloe Gunther
I became a vegetarian, and I am now thinking about becoming a vegan. In this discernment, I see God staring back at me.
Solar panels are seen on the roof of the Paul VI audience hall at the Vatican in this Dec. 1, 2010, file photo. Installing “green rooftops” are one way for colleges to participate in the Laudato Si’ Action Platform. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Michael SchuckNancy Tuchman
“Laudato Si’” reveals global ecological challenges that threaten our very existence. Catholic universities cannot wait to embrace clean energy and help build a sustainable world.