Economics

(iStock/JamesBrey)
Nathan Beacom January 14, 2019
The latest five-year farm bill continues a pattern of subsidizing corporations while squeezing every last drop of use out of farm families and cropland.
On Jan 1, supporters of Brazil's new President Jair Bolsonaro display a giant banner of him on his inauguration day in Brasilia, Brazil. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Filipe Domingues January 08, 2019
Mr. Bolsonaro’s far-right rhetoric during the campaign has led to uncertainties about his policies as president and drawn international concern about the course he will set for the nation.
People walk past an electronic board showing Hong Kong share index outside a local bank in Hong Kong Monday, Jan. 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Paul D. McNelis, S.J. January 08, 2019
The press in China does not make any mention of an impending “trade war”—only trade frictions.
The Editors December 28, 2018
The principle of subsidiarity is poorly served in these cases—when U.S. cities and states act as if they are in an economic Cold War with one another and the “arms race” of tax incentives helps only a handful of already successful private companies.
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaking during Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Commons in London, on Dec. 19. Britain is due to leave the EU on March 29, but it remains unclear whether lawmakers will approve the divorce agreement negotiated with the bloc.(Mark Duffy/UK Parliament via AP)
David Stewart December 21, 2018
The British state continues to make preparations for the growing possibility of a no-deal exit, an outcome sufficiently plausible that it is spending large sums recruiting new staff and renting warehouse space for key supplies, such as E.U.-produced medicine, that may abruptly prove hard to come by.
The farm bill that passed both houses of Congress by wide margins doesn't have money in it to protect endangered species, but it did preserve one that had been on the threatened list: bipartisanship.