Death Penalty

Demonstrators are seen near the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., to show their opposition to the death penalty July 13, 2020. (CNS photo/Bryan Woolston, Reuters)
Erika Rasmussen September 16, 2020
Krisanne Vaillancourt Murphy: “The death penalty serves as a sort of litmus test for how our nation is making progress to either dismantle or uphold racism.”
Catholic leaders have joined their voices with members of the Navajo Nation in opposing the Aug. 26 scheduled execution of Lezmond Mitchell, the only Native American on federal death row.
Auska Mitchell holds a photograph of his nephew, Lezmond Mitchell, on Aug. 21 in the Phoenix area. Lezmond Mitchell is scheduled to be executed this Wednesday, Aug. 26. (AP Photo/Jonathan J. Cooper)
The Catholic Church and the Navajo Nation stand together in opposition to the execution of Lezmond Mitchell because it, like the racism which brought his death sentence to pass, erodes the sanctity of human life, writes Krisanne Vaillancourt Murphy.
In Indiana, the second federal execution in three days was carried out when Wesley Purkey was strapped to a gurney and injected with lethal chemicals as he expressed words of regret for what he had done.
People hold signs during a candlelight prayer vigil Dec. 8, 2019, held to oppose the Trump administration's plan to reinstate the federal death penalty. (CNS photo/David Maung)
Helen Prejean, C.S.J. July 15, 2020
What is the moral imperative behind the government’s urgency to hasten the death of its citizens?
Demonstrators are seen near the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., to show their opposition to the death penalty July 13, 2020. (CNS photo/Bryan Woolston, Reuters)
Helen Prejean: “While we were all sleeping, the government killed a man under cloak of darkness.”