Death Penalty

The U.S. Supreme Court, no stranger to death penalty cases, is looking very narrowly at two aspects of capital punishment this term.
Abolishing the death penalty worldwide would reflect the brave and hope-filled belief that crime can be dealt with without capital punishment and that a criminal should be given the chance to reform, a top Vatican diplomat told world leaders.
Tobias Winright August 17, 2018
Did Pope Francis depart from Scripture and tradition in declaring the death penalty "inadmissible"? Or was his declaration rooted deeply in both?
In this April 18, 2018, file photo, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts speaks at the legislature, in Lincoln, Neb. (Gwyneth Roberts/Lincoln Journal Star via AP, File)
Gov. Pete Ricketts helped finance a ballot drive to reinstate capital punishment after lawmakers overrode his veto in 2015.
Pope Francis delivers a blessing from his studio window overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Aug. 5. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia File)
William K. Reilly August 13, 2018
A former head of the E.P.A. warns that the pope’s message on the death penalty, like his message on the environment, may not make it to the pews.
In this Aug. 16, 2010 file photo, Billy Ray Irick, on death row for raping and killing a 7-year-old girl in 1985, appears in a Knox County criminal courtroom in Knoxville, Tenn. (Michael Patrick/The Knoxville News Sentinel via AP, File)
The execution would occur a week after Pope Francis revealed new church teaching that deems the death penalty “inadmissible” under all circumstances.