Cover Image

September 17, 2001

Vol.185 / No.7
Books
John J. SavantSeptember 17, 2001

The more particular the focus goes one literary axiom the more universal its resonance Robert Frost rsquo s New England or William Faulkner rsquo s ldquo little postage stamp of Mississippi rdquo evoke worldwide response and admiration because the very palpability of their specific worlds will

Letters
Our readersSeptember 17, 2001

The Key WordCongratulations to Francis A. Sullivan, S.J., for his article, “The Magisterium in the New Millennium” (8/27). Father Sullivan feels he has no “prophetic gifts” with which to foresee how the magisterium will be exercised in the future. I believe he is a prophet fo

The Word
John R. DonahueSeptember 17, 2001

As the bright light of summer yields to the soft hues of autumn while students settle into school and parish activities move into high gear Christians often ponder over vacation expenses tuition bills and the impending cost of new projects Life in Christ seems to be taken over by calculator and

Poetry
Chris AndersonSeptember 17, 2001

Roads lie buried here

John F. KavanaughSeptember 17, 2001

A friend recently asked me whether the Catholic Church, in its opposition to embryonic stem cell research, is committing a folly equal to its condemnation of Galileo. An apt question: the dawn of genetics is as revolutionary as the idea that the earth moved around the sun. Galileo’s tool was t

Books
Robert DurbackSeptember 17, 2001

The Jesuit John Dear once asked God for a sign Not only did he ask for a sign he gave God a timetable right now Heaven apparently was shaken The sign was granted immediately On the spot Dear was 21 at the time and only weeks away from entering the Society of Jesus Dear felt the best way to pr

Of Many Things
George M. AndersonSeptember 17, 2001

My first encounter with homelessness came when I was 10 or 12. Passing a friend’s house in my hometown in Maryland late one summer afternoon, I was amazed to see two people sound asleep at the edge of the wooded lot next door: a man and a woman who evidently had no place to stay for the night.