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Arts & CultureBooks
Tom Deignan
In “The Agitators,” Dorothy Wickenden explores 19th-century intersections of class, racism and patriarchy through the lives of the escaped slave Harriet Tubman and the activists Martha Wright and Frances Seward.
Arts & CultureBooks
Boreta Singleton
The reader can see God in all areas of Toni Morrison’s characters’ circumstances—in the “magic,” in the pain and suffering, and in the call to healing and wholeness that leads to life.
Arts & CultureBooks
Bill McCormick, S.J.
If Catholics wanted to be tolerated in the early years of the Maryland Colony, they had to prove their loyalty—first to the Stuarts, then to Parliament, then the House of Hanover and then the fledgling American republic.
Arts & CultureBooks
Franklin Freeman
Neeli Cherkovski's expanded edition of his biography of Lawrence Ferlinghetti is a book by “a poet who set out to celebrate another poet.”
Arts & CultureBooks
Sam Rocha
Alejandro Nava begins his formal analysis by situating hip-hop as something that “recovers the oral, rhythmic, and melodic nature of ancient scriptural transmission.”
Arts & CultureBooks
James T. Keane
America's spring 2022 literary issue has a little bit of something for everyone—including the historian in each of us.