Politics & Society

Anita's Tortilleria, a restaurant and gas station on the south side of Fremont, Neb., is one sign of the growing diversity in many American small towns. (Nathan Beacom)
As rural America becomes more diverse, it faces many of the problems associated with big cities, writes Nathan Beacom. The urban-rural divide in our politics does not reflect reality.
Nathan BeacomSeptember 18, 2020

What comes after the era of the parochial school?

February 06, 2019
00:00
Displaced people rest on the premises of a gas station Sept. 11, 2020, after fires broke out at the Moria refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos. The camp, which was mostly destroyed Sept. 9, was home to at least 12,000 people, six times its maximum capacity of just over 2,000 asylum-seekers. (CNS photo/Alkis Konstantinidis, Reuters)
Even as the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees pleaded with countries to take in more of the 79.5 million displaced people worldwide, the Trump administration has consistently lowered the refugee cap each year.
People displaced from the destroyed Moria refugee camp sit by fires along a road on the Greek island of Lesbos Sept. 15, 2020. The camp, which was mostly destroyed in fires Sept. 9, was home to at least 12,000 people, six times its maximum capacity of just over 2,000 asylum-seekers. (CNS photo/Alkis Konstantinidis, Reuters)
The overcrowded, underequipped Camp Moria, had an official capacity for just 2,800. Its population had been as high as 20,000 refugees, a number reduced to about 12,000 at the time of the fires.
Marilyn Miranda, 9, draped in a Salvadoran flag, attends an immigration rally with her mother outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington June 4, 2019. A Sept. 14, 2020, decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for 9th Circuit in Ramos v. Nielsen brings the Trump administration one step closer to ending Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for almost all people with TPS in the United States. (CNS photo/Leah Millis, Reuters)
The court said the president was within his rights to revoke Temporary Protected Status from Salvadoran immigrants. The ruling also is expected to affect TPS holders from Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Sudan and Nepal.
A protester holds a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2019, after the court ruled against adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. (CNS photo/Carlos Barria, Reuters) 
The Covid-19 pandemic and skepticism of the federal government are forcing Latino leaders to get creative in promoting this year's census, reports J.D. Long-García.
J.D. Long-GarcíaAugust 10, 2020