Volunteering is good for your health

Anyone with a passing familiarity with the Gospels or church teaching knows that helping one’s neighbor is good for the soul. Now there is growing evidence that acts of service can benefit physical health as well. In a study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, researchers found that Canadian 10th-grade students enrolled in a volunteer program lost weight and had lower levels of cholesterol compared with peers who did not participate. And in Social Science and Medicine (January 2016), Eric Kim and Sara Konrath report that among people over the age of 50, volunteering was associated with higher use of preventive measures (like flu shots and prostate exams) and 38 percent fewer nights in hospitals.

There is, however, a caveat: motivation matters. In an article in The Atlantic by James Hamblin (12/30/15) exploring the connection between volunteering and health outcomes, Mr. Kim explains, “Only the people who were doing it for more outward reasons—compassion for others—had reduced rates of mortality.” So spending a few nights at the soup kitchen this February just to keep one’s health resolutions for the new year on track might not have the desired effect.

Advertisement

Pope Francis has given Catholics ample inspiration to carry out the corporal works of mercy anyway. In his message for the World Day of Peace, the pope said that as a sign of the Jubilee Year of Mercy, we are “called to make specific and courageous gestures of concern for [our] most vulnerable members, such as prisoners, migrants, the unemployed and the infirm.” Such service is surely its own reward; a papal indulgence and healthy heart could be a welcome bonus.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Richard Booth
2 years 3 months ago
I would only add that, in my opinion, regardless of the benefits derived from service to others, selfless giving should be the most powerful motive. As one performs selfless acts over and over again, a habit develops. The habit is good because the behavior is good and, because the person possesses the habit as part of her or his personality, he or she can be said to be a good person. Lesser motives may lead to less positive conclusions, since good works can and have been done for less than good reasons. Manipulation, praise, and reputation are but three examples.
William Rydberg
2 years 3 months ago
After all we are "body" and "soul" composites. Makes sense...

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

 Pope Francis arrives in procession to celebrate Mass marking the feast of Pentecost in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican May 20. The pope at his "Regina Coeli" announced that he will create 14 new cardinals June 29. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Eleven of the new cardinals are under the age of 80 and so have the right to vote in the next conclave.
Gerard O’ConnellMay 20, 2018
Images: AP, Wikimedia Commons
Bishop Curry described Teilhard as “one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century.”
Angelo Jesus CantaMay 19, 2018
Both men were close to each other in life, and both are much revered by Pope Francis.
Gerard O’ConnellMay 19, 2018
The Gaza Nakba demonstrations this week have done nothing to advance the situation of Palestinian refugees, nor did they provide relief to the people of Gaza, who dwell in an open-air prison, hemmed in and oppressed at every turn.