a woman at the last supper

i knew exactly what he meant
for i know about body and blood
as well as flowers and yeast and sewing
he used words i could understand about giving life
and during those moments
i felt the world revolved around me instead of only men

but now
there are dishes to wash, a floor to sweep
and food to put away
yes, i know about body and blood; about giving life
and i will remember

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Julett Broadnax
7 years 3 months ago
Thanks for sharing your poem around the Last Supper.  I have been trying to acquire a copy of a painting by a Polish artist depicting women and children at the Last Supper.
After all, this was at Passover time and traditionally the children were there to ask the questions and of course, who served the meal?  Scripture does not always include all the details of an event - only the parts the writer wanted to emphasize.  I have had no problem with envisioning women there - in spite of the prevalence of paintings that depict only Christ and the twelve apostles there.
Elizabeth Whitlow
7 years 2 months ago
Sister Lou Ella Hickman's poetry has touched my heart for many years, and seeing it published in America Magazine is a great joy.  Please print more of her marvelous work.

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