A Look In The Cave: abstract from a medical encyplodia

The brain dwells in a cranial cave,
prefers few neighbors, most often will pretend
that no one is home; has a chronic
illness, meta-cathexis, a psychic
continuum of disembodied energy
which floats above the particle world,
in layman terminology, desire; exhibits
a joie de loquacity infrequently, partially,
preferring instead the silence common
to creatures of habitual solitude, those
that have fear of the light; is the soul’s
pharmacist, dispensing alternate doses
of adrenalin and gossip, chemical impulses
which cause the pale locomotive of the body
to toss and turn; often sleeps under a quilt
of delusion, a random patchwork of truth
and fiction, a blanket of dreams and wishes;
has been rumored on occasion to speak
in calm low tones of a high far place…”

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SEAN MALONE
6 years 8 months ago
My Grandfather lived in Spokane and was in the food industry.  He was an advisor to Presidents Hoover and Roosevelt.  He would have appreciated "A Look in the Cave" as much as I did.  With your permission, I have forwarded the poem to fifty other people.  Seán  [email protected]

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