What You Will Notice

Here are samples of new wording for passages from the greeting, the Glory to God, the Creed and the memorial acclamations. (These texts have not received final official approval.)

The Lord be with you. And with your spirit.

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Glory to God in the highest, and on earth to p[eople of good will. We praise you, we bless you, we adore you, we glorify you, we give you thanks for your great glory.

I believe in God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible.

We proclaim your death, O Lord, and profess yoru resurrection until you come in glory.

Other proposed changes are less dramatic. Consider, for example, the Confiteor and the Holy Holy:

I confess to almight God, and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have sinned greatly...through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault.

Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.

Other parts of the Mass, such as the Lords prayer and the Lamb of God, are not expected to change at all.

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Barbara Donsky
10 years 4 months ago
In terms of doctrine, the changes seem much ado about nothing; in terms of writing style,the changes are for the worse. Here's why. For example, "I believe in God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth..." sounds pedestrian when compared to the magisterial "creator of heaven and earth." After all, one makes lots of things, from cakes to cars, but certainly not a universe, with all things visible and invisible. This seems to lump God's creation and Henry Ford's assembly line into the same category. Moreover, the line from the Gloria -- "We praise you, bless you, adore you, glorify you, and give thanks..." -- is redundant. When one speaks of "praise" and "glory," is it not much the same? And, moreover, on a doctrinal level,do we bless God or vice-versa? Liturgical language is most eloquent when clear and to the point. Simplify, simplify, simplify. I'd also like to point out, in all humilty, the typo and misspelling in the manuscript, knowing full well that when I read my own copy, I'll probably see more of the same! .

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