New Traditional Churches: A slideshow

May 28, 2012 is our liturgy and design issue, and in our culture section Michael E. DeSanctis of Gannon Unversity looks at the trend toward bulding new Catholic churches using elements of traditional design. You can read Professor DeSanctis's article here.

Accompanying the article is a slideshow featuring several churches not mentioned in the article. View the slideshow here.

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Joan Carroll
6 years 5 months ago
It will be interesting to see how 85 year old priests climb the steps without hand railings to get to the altars in these churches.
Katherine McEwen
6 years 3 months ago
One thing I notice in the slide show is how disability unfriendly all the sanctuaries and seating in these churches are. Have the architectural provisions of the Americans with Disabilies Act been totally erased from these architects' mental databanks? As well as the parish committees who brainstormed these designs? Do the architects, planners and parishioners totally forget their compatriots with physical, movement or other disabilities? As well as baby boomers and other seniors? Or the regular people for whom traditional 20th century and earlier architecture and interior furnishings just doesn't work? What about clergy, lay ministers, musicians and worship leaders' access?

Advertisement

The latest from america

Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta arrives in Osorno, Chile, on June 14, beginning a pastoral mission to promote healing in the wake of a clerical sexual abuse crisis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Archdiocese of Santiago)
The pope’s decision gives the Maltese archbishop the lead role in the fight against abuse in the church and in the protection of minors.
Gerard O’ConnellNovember 13, 2018
How do you pray? Do you kneel? Sit? Lie down?
James Martin, S.J.November 12, 2018
“This hypothesis—that the reality of personal sexual misconduct by bishops...was a factor which inclined some bishops not to vigorously pursue allegations of abuse among their clergy—I believe that this is a valid hypothesis.”
Kevin ClarkeNovember 12, 2018
Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, center, leads the opening prayer Nov. 12 during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. Also pictured are Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles, vice president of the USCCB, and Msgr. J. Brian Bransfield, general secretary. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
U.S. bishops tell the authors of a groundbreaking new book that they feel a duty to speak out on issues of the day, but they must tread carefully with a secular press and fallout from the sexual abuse crisis.