State Contraception Mandates

The 28 states requiring that contraception coverage be included in prescription drug plans are: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

The 17 states with a religious exemption for employers are: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island and West Virginia.

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Missouri allows any employer, religious or secular, to seek an exemption from the contraceptive coverage mandate. Nevada has a religious exemption for insurers.

Source: The Catholic Review

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Antoinette Carbone
6 years 8 months ago
This is a sad time for our country.  Not just for Catholics.  Our religious leaders, from Universities, Hospital Administrations, and leaders in Dioceses all around this country gave support to Obama's health care, knowing that certain issues were not fully resolved.  Well the conscience clause issue won over our so-call Catholic political leaders.  How does Biden feel now - is he happy to be a shill.  I expected better of him.  This is going to be an interesting election - people like myself who support social justice can not support Obama.  Maybe our hope is in Stephen Colbert.
James Kelleher
6 years 8 months ago

So, Mitt Romney's "Romney care" plan in Massachusetts has the same religious exemption as the HHS rule creates. Will he "flip or flop" or remian consistent on this issue? Is there a difference in the positions of the 2 leading candidates?

If 98% of Catholic women have used contraceptives before the rule, isn't the issue moot - except for the men who run the Church?

Where was the outrage of the bishops when 28 states - their citizens, legislatures, and chief executive - previously enacted their requirement?

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