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September 22, 2003

Vol.189 / No.8

September 22, 2003

Mary Anne ReeseSeptember 22, 2003

They are married, single, divorced and of every nationality and ethnic group. Their ranks include professionals, laborers, students, military and immigrants. Some are straight, some gay, some are parents and some have disabilities. The common ground is that they are Catholic young adults, defined by

Phyllis M. HanlonSeptember 22, 2003

On the surface, the scene is not unusuala group of young men and women laughing and talking in an informal setting while munching snacks and sipping beer. Dig a little deeper, however, and you will find that a unique objective unites these individuals. A burning hunger, not for physical nourishment

Jane ReganSeptember 22, 2003

With growing clarity and insistence, voices within the church—both official and unofficial—speak repeatedly of the importance of the faith formation of adults to the life and vitality of the church. Of course, adult faith formation is not a new concern. Most of the ecclesial documents th

Edward P. CullenSeptember 22, 2003

On a cold Monday evening just before last Christmas, 22 Chicago women gathered to discuss how they live out their spirituality in the workplace. The group, responding to an invitation from the Archdiocesan Women’s Commission, included white-collar and blue-collar workers of various ages and et

Of Many Things
Patricia A. KossmannSeptember 22, 2003

If Broadway producers can do it, why not book publishers? “It” is the revival, in the case of theater, or the reissue, in the case of books. Heaven knows there is ample need for updated editions of longstanding classics, or what the industry calls “backlist staples.” And spea

Letters
Our readersSeptember 22, 2003

Old and New

The Vatican Concordat With Hitler’s Reich (9/1), by Robert A. Krieg, confirms what had to be the case in history. It has always seemed intuitive to me that the Catholic Church must have made a pact with the devil in order to survive Hitler’s grasp.

It was the

Editorials
The EditorsSeptember 22, 2003

The evening sun is perceived as still setting when in fact it has already dipped below the horizon. Something similar happens in other contexts. A historic period, for example, may actually have ended before the people it shaped quite realize it has gone.   An instance of this is suggested almo