What Should Be Done?: From October 8, 2001

What was the appropriate response to the attacks of 9/11? Less than a month after the collapse of the World Trade Center, J. Bryan Hehir outlined the pastoral, social and policy responses necessary to meet the challenges of the post-9/11 world. Father Hehir called the policy response the most difficult of the three. "A measured response to transnational terrorism cannot be primarily a military response," Father Hehir wrote. "Deeper issues than the use of force lie beneath terrorist actions."

Read "What Can Be Done? What Should Be Done?"

TM Lutas
5 years 11 months ago
It is unfortunate that you are re-running a response to the horrific attacks of 9/11 that makes basic errors regarding the nature of the struggle instead of the taking the 10 years that we have had to research and reflect and improve on all of our responses and providing something that has benefited from our improved understanding of our enemy.

In those early days, it was not so obvious that these attackers not only were attacking the US but were attacking the very legitimacy of the effort to limit war to state actors. To a certain extent, they have succeeded in legitimizing non-state warfare again. Taking up the problem of non-state warfare, especially when we have a major GOP candidate who is championing it (Dr. Ron Paul's 2001 and 2007 bills on reinvigorating letters of Marque and Reprisal) is something that could not have been realistically covered in 2001 but would have been a timely effort in these days. Well, maybe next year.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

An explosive device was detonated outside the offices of the Mexican bishops' conference, directly across the street from the country's most visited religious site, the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. walks from the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, as he steers the Senate toward a crucial vote on the Republican health care bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Republican proposals “exclude too many people, including immigrants,” Bishop Frank J. Dewane said in a statement.
Without quite knowing it, I had begun to rely on the tradition of the Roman Catholic Church.
Elizabeth BruenigJuly 25, 2017
A demonstration for affordable health care in New York City on July 13. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, called on the Senate July 21 to fix problems with the Affordable Care Act in a more narrow way, rather than repeal it without an adequate replacement. (CNS photo/Andrew Gombert, EPA)
The sisters say that they are “most troubled by the cuts it would make to Medicaid by ending the Medicaid expansion and instituting a per capita cap [on spending].”