Revisiting 'Ex Corde Ecclesiae'

Promulgated by Pope John Paul II in 1990, the encyclical "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" on Catholic higher education was formally adopted by the U.S. bishops in 2001. In the period prior to its adoption, there was vigorous debate in the Catholic press about the role of the Catholic university and the relationship between bishops and theologians. Here we offer a selection of articles on "Ex Corde" from five notable contributors.

"The Impending Death of Higher Education," Jon Nilson, May 28, 2001

"The Survival of Catholic Education," Monica Hellwig, July 16, 2001 (a response to Jon Nilson)

"The Advantages of a Catholic University," Avery Dulles, May 20, 2002

"The Truly Catholic Education," Richard G. Malloy, October 11, 2004

"Higher Standards," Dean Brackley, February 6, 2006

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