The New Roman Missal: A selection of America's coverage

Beginning in Advent of 2011, the U.S. church will be using a new English translation of the Roman Missal. The current translation was promulgated in 1973, and for the past past several years the International Commission on English has been working on a new text. The controversy surrounding this translation, including the decision not to use a text proposed by an earlier iteration of ICEL, has been well documented in America. Here we offer a selection of our coverage from both our print and online editions. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's essay on the new Missal, "A Graced Moment," appears in the May 23 issue.

"Liturgists Worry About Upcoming Implementation," Signs of the Times, February 14, 2011

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"An Open Letter to the U.S. Catholic Bishops," Anthony Ruff, O.S.B., Web Only

"Bringing Liturgy to Life," Steven P. Millies, February 7, 2011

"For You and Who Else?" Paul Philibert, January 3, 2011

Examples of the new texts, Web Only

"Liturgists Prepare for Coming Changes in Mass Text," Signs of the Times, August 2, 2010

"Welcoming the Roman Missal," Arthur J. Serratelli, March 1, 2010

"Defending the New Missal," Peter M. J. Stravinskas, Web Only

"What If We Said, 'Wait'?" Michael G. Ryan, December 14, 2009

"How Accessible Are the New Mass Translations?" Donald W. Trautman, May 21, 2007

"The Quest for Authentic Liturgy," Donald W. Trautman, October 22, 2001

"ICEL and Liturgical Translations," Ronald D. Witherup, October 7, 2000

"Troubling Assertions From Rome About ICEL," Nathan D. Mitchell, July 1, 2000

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Mike Evans
7 years 6 months ago
Even my own bishop opposed this new edition but said 'I was out voted." What a shame that so many translation experts have been ignored and so little attention paid to the rhythm and cadence of the prayers and flow of words. America readers would do themselves a favor by reviewing all the linked articles on this issue. I predict a substantial complaint and distaste in the mouths of all our congregants when this is implemented. Worse, a huge amount of the translation is simply unmemorable and certainly not kid-friendly. I can see them looking at mom and dad and asking - what does consubstantial mean? And why should the Lord only be with your spirit and not with your whole self?
Thomas Lang
7 years 6 months ago
Mr. Evans - I would venture a guess that most Moms and Dads wouldn't be able to answer most of their kids' questions as to why we do and say what we do at Mass presently.  I hope that we can put the dissention aside as the roll-out of the new Roman Missal is moving forward, and see this as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to provide much needed catechesis on the Mass to everyone!  Together we will teach and learn about all of the beauty and wonder which the Mass holds for us.

The words at first might sound a bit strange, but remember, we're trying to describe and talk about God and things which are supernatural, and not of our nature.  Our human language will never be able to fully capture the essence of God and of things associated with Him.  But through some basic education we can learn and understand the theology behind the new words and how they build up our worship of God even more than at present!

The goal is that if Moms and Dads WANT to learn, they will be able to.  Then at Mass, they will be able to answer those questions from their wondering children, or at least know where to go to find the answer.  Such learning can never be a bad thing!

My prayer is that articles like this will soon go by the wayside so that we can stop focusing upon what separates us and instead move forward in a joyful spirit of learning about our faith more deeply together as God's people!

Peace to you Mr. Evans!
7 years 6 months ago
I'm at a loss as to the point - at this stage, with the changes already promulgated - for re-hashing the objections. How is that helpful?
RONAN KILGANNON REV
7 years 6 months ago
I have been using the new texts at Mass for some weeks now. They must be used in Australia from Pentecost Sunday. There is a different rhythm to the priestly prayers and practice is needed. But they are elegant, profound and magisterial. When I compare the equivalent prayers from the old translation in the breviary, I am shocked at how weak and bland they are. And I agree with the comment of Mr Tom Faranda above. Editors, it is now time to 'sentire cum ecclesia'.
Gerald McGrane
7 years 6 months ago
Thank you Deacon Tom and Fr. Kilgannon for your comments.  I could not have said it better.

 

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